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Australia loses crown as top destination for expats

Global Moving TrendsInterested in where and why people are moving across the globe, at MoveHub we undertook our annual Global Moving Trends report to see where the most popular countries are for expats to move to for 2017.

We analysed the search data from over 350,000 moving enquiries, from April 2016 - 17 to see how moving trends have evolved, and find out the most and least popular countries for expats.

And the winner is...

New Zealand pipped Australia to the post, knocking the crown from the long-reigning champs. Australia has long established itself as the favourite destination for expats, however 2017 saw a 5% decrease in searches from the previous financial year, with the new winner emerging. Interest in moving to New Zealand soared by 30% year on year, showing that the world’s love affair with Australia is on the rocks. Despite less global interest in moving, interestingly those looking to leave Australia have reduced dramatically by 41%.

New Zealand enjoyed its highest ever levels of immigration on record, particularly from the US and the UK, potentially due to the political unrest in both countries. Interest in moving to New Zealand from the US is up a whopping 71% year on year, and from the UK an even more staggering 83%. New Zealand’s strong economy and cheaper cost of living both contributed to the rise in popularity of the new winner.

Although Australia continues to receive a lot of interest as an expat destination, it is interesting to see how the moving trends have evolved and will continue to evolve. Cost of living, way of life and general culture are now the key considerations for those looking to move abroad, which have fuelled a dip in interest to the former big 3: the UK, the USA and Australia.

Download the report here